Cardboard testimonies

Pastor Jorge Munoz says our own stories can be a "powerful weapon" for the kingdom of God.

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Mamarapha College graduation is a special event. It is a celebration of achievement—a stage completed. It is the joy in knowing the objectives of the college are being accomplished. It is an acknowledgement of God’s guidance upon the lives of the students, and the leaders and teachers who minister at the college.

There’s another reason I enjoy the event—the presentation of the “cardboard testimonies”. Every year, students film their testimonies—their stories before and after coming to Mamarapha—written on a piece of cardboard. More than any other moment, it fills me with the complete joy of witnessing the saving power and grace of the gospel. The stories are powerful, transformational, real and inspiring. They confront me with the change that is taking place in my own spiritual journey.

I’ve seen the “cardboard testimonies” many times. I always ask myself, What would I write this year on my cardboard? How does the story of Jesus and His example challenge me to make a radical change in my life?

And radical changes they are. When the students go back to their communities, others notice, pay attention and realise that there is something new and different.

"How does the story of Jesus and His example challenge me to make a radical change in my life?"

A couple of weeks ago I had the privilege of seeing many of the Mamarapha graduates at ATSIM’s national camp. They were not alone, but came with new friends, family and future Mamarapha students.

I come back to my own “cardboard testimony” and wonder if we tell each other—spouses, children, church—about the transforming power of Christ in our lives. Hearing and seeing what God is doing in each other’s lives is inspiring but also a powerful weapon for the kingdom of God.

“And they overcame him by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony” (Revelation 12:11).


Pastor Jorge Munoz is president of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Australia.