Adventist education ‘brilliantly represented’ at national forum

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Adventist education graduate Dr Kristian Stefani (left) along with two other millennial colleagues, PM Scott Morrison (centre) and Christian Schools Australia director of research and innovation Darren Iselin (right).

Adventist Schools Australia (ASA) leaders were among the 300 who attended the Christian Schools Policy Forum Dinner in the Great Hall at Parliament House in Canberra (ACT) on May 24.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison was among those at the dinner. He presented a 20-minute talk on the vital role of Christian education in Australia. More than 50 MPs also attended the event including Minister for Education Allan Tudge.

The event focused on the contribution of Christian education to the common good, with a significant part of the event dedicated to the launch of the findings from a Cardus Education study. The survey of post-school outcomes found that most Christian school graduates believe that their time at school helped prepare them to find a sense of meaning, purpose and direction in life.

ASA associate national director, quality assurance Dr Jean Carter (left), Dr Kristian Stefani (centre) and Dr Daryl Murdoch (right).

“This piece of research was jointly sponsored by ASA and other Christian school partners,” explained ASA national director Dr Daryl Murdoch.

Adventist education graduate Dr Kristian Stefani was one of the four millennials chosen to share at the event on how a Christian education impacted his life.

“I asked principals across Australia to nominate millennial graduates, and Kristian was an outstanding candidate. He spoke very well and represented Adventist education brilliantly,” said Dr Murdoch.

ASA national director Dr Daryl Murdoch as the master of ceremony for the Monday session of the program.

In his speech, Dr Stefani emphasised how the education he received was fundamental for him not only to excel in his chosen career path as a doctor but also in him placing a strong focus on supporting the community.

“Now more than ever, Australia needs young people who put others and the common good before their own selfish interests and who are committed to changing the world by first bettering their own corner of existence. I firmly believe that Christian education plays a vital role in applying that stability to the fabric of society,” he said.

The event was part of a three-day conference that discussed topics of importance to Christian schooling.

“This is an important event to be part of because it promotes the goals and achievements of Christian education in Australian society,” said Dr Murdoch, who was the master of ceremony for the Monday session of the program.