ADRA CEO to join $1 million charity ride

0
55
SHARE

Wahroonga, New South Wales 

Despite not owning a “real bike”, ADRA Australia CEO Mark Webster has committed to riding alongside supporters in the 2015 Great Ocean Road ride.

I’m not really a cyclist—but I’m a big believer in doing whatever we can to help people experience life as it was meant to be.

“I’m not really a cyclist—but I’m a big believer in doing whatever we can to help people experience life as it was meant to be,” said Mr Webster. “I also believe it’s important to genuinely thank our supporters whenever I can.”

“That’s why I’ll be puffing it out alongside 120 others cycling the Great Ocean Road next year.”
 

ADRA Australia CEO Mark Webster.

The ride, organised by not-for-profit 25000spins, is also set to break the $A1 million mark for funds raised through the organisations charity cycling events.

“I lived an incredibly blessed life,” said Craig Shipton, the man behind 25000spins. “When I look at poverty around the world—and particularly the 17 kids that die every minute as a result—I feel compelled to act. Organising these cycling events is my way of using my skills and interests to make the world a better place.”

“Last year, ADRA riders raised more than $100,000 for our work improving people’s access to sustainable food sources,” said Mr Webster. “This year, we’ll be riding in support of malnourished kids in Indonesia—and the work ADRA is doing to ensure they have opportunities to thrive.”

ADRA’s INSTINCT project is working with parents, care-givers and local health services to improve the nutrition of more than 20,000 malnourished children in Indonesia’s remote east. 

In addition to the Great Ocean Road ride (February 2015), fundraising rides for ADRA Australia also include the Queenstown Classic (March), London to Paris (July—coincides with Tour de France) and Swiss Adventure (July).

Registrations are now open and the limited spaces filling fast. Visit <www.25000spins.com> to sign up today and support ADRA’s work in Indonesia.