World Changers—Miriam

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Miriam lives in Papua New Guinea’s picturesque Markham Valley, near Lae. A young woman in her early 30s, she works with disabled children for a living.

One night Miriam had a dream. She saw the words “My vision is your mission” and a light chasing her. She tried to run and hide under huts and bamboo, but finally asked, “What do you want me to do?”

The whole village knew she had good news, even the old blind chief, and she shared the Gospel with more than 400 people that weekend, one person or family at a time.

A Bible text flashed in the sky in response: “Then I saw another angel flying in midair, and he had the eternal gospel to proclaim to those who live on the earth—to every nation, tribe, language and people” (Revelation 14:6, NIV). 

The next day Miriam attended an Independence Day rally and she watched a group of Pathfinders march past. When they turned, she saw on the back of their uniform the same words she’d seen in her dream: “My vision is your mission”. That afternoon a friend told her she needed to go to the South Pacific Division World Changers Youth Congress in Brisbane, and remembering her dream, she decided to go.

Miriam loved the congress and cried her way through most sessions. When the call was made for those who wanted to recommit their lives to Jesus, she went down to the front and had a powerful reconversion experience on her knees.

Back home, Miriam immediately started looking for ways to put her vision into action. “How can I change the world?” she wondered. That night she dreamt she was in the highlands where her father’s village is. There were hundreds of pandanus palms heavy with fruit, but no-one was harvesting them. The following Sabbath Miriam decided to go to the village—a place where only the Lutheran pastor owned a Bible—and witness to the people.

The only person willing to accompany her was a nine-year-old boy. “Don’t come. You’re too little,” she tried to tell him, but he insisted. They walked for a day and a night, taking turns carrying a congress World Changers bag full of Adventist literature. 

When Miriam reached the village she was greeted by her aunt and uncle, who said they’d been waiting for her, despite the fact she hadn’t told them she was coming. The whole village knew she had good news, even the old blind chief, and she shared the Gospel with more than 400 people that weekend, one person or family at a time.

Now, thanks to Miriam’s testimony, a nearby Adventist church as well as some individual church members are building a relationship with this village. The chief has also asked her to come back with other Adventists, saying, “We haven’t heard good news like this for a long time.”
 


Maritza Munoz was an intern with RECORD when she wrote this piece. As told by Nick Kross.