My story—Richard Anderson

0
22
SHARE

I grew up in Western Queensland, mainly around Toowoomba. My mum was Catholic but my dad never really liked Christianity. I started to smoke and drink at the age of 12; by the time I was 19 my lifestyle had degenerated. I was an alcoholic. But I thought I was invincible and continued on, marrying my wife, Maureen, around this time and having a child together.

But when our baby was only eight weeks old, tragedy struck—cot death. Our grief drove us to look for support, and since Maureen also had some church background, we started attending a Baptist church. It was “The Old Rugged Cross” that clinched it—they played that song one Sunday and I accepted Jesus. In 1982 we were both baptised and I haven’t drunk or smoked since.

Our lives have been hard at times but I’m starting to learn that every problem you end up with is another stepping stone to where God wants you to be.

Our faith sustained us through some tough times. Maureen had a number of miscarriages as well as a brain tumour and a heart attack. I had a bad fall from 6 metres up, which left me in hospital and paralysed for quite a while. But God blessed us with healing and children and we continued our active involvement in the church, even moving to Sydney where I took a construction job with New Tribes Mission for two years.

Some Adventist friends of ours mentioned a job was going at Karalundi, a remote school run by Adventists in the Western Australian desert. I followed up and found myself chatting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ministries director Steve Piez at Rooty Hill McDonald’s in Sydney. Turns out it was a job interview!

I’ve been working at Karalundi Aboriginal Education Community for 10 years now. It’s my dream job and involves putting my practical skills to work around the campus and long drives through Australia’s desert areas. The staff have always been friendly and accepting towards us, even though we weren’t Adventists.

God finally got through to us four years ago and asked us to take the next step in our journey. We were accepted into the Seventh-day Adventist Church by profession of faith. 

Our lives have been hard at times but I’m starting to learn that every problem you end up with is another stepping stone to where God wants you to be.
 

SHARE