Feature film begins historic production

0
36
SHARE

Ringwood, Victoria

Scripts are being finalised, storyboards completed and filming locations set for an Australian Union Conference (AUC) heritage film project entitled Tell The World

Originally planned as a DVD series, the production has escalated into an entirely dramatised, full-length, historic feature film—something never previously attempted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

“This film will clearly show God’s leading in the establishment of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and our commitment to biblical teachings,” said AUC president and executive producer, Pastor Chester Stanley. “We’re making Tell The World not only as a powerful evangelistic resource but as a nurturing tool. It will teach young people about the dynamic beginnings of our Church and re-inspire long-term members.”

The film will follow prominent pioneers of the Church, including Joseph Bates, James White, John Nevins Andrews and Ellen Harmon, as they discover new Bible truths. 
 



Originally planned as a DVD series, the production has escalated into an entirely dramatised, full-length, historic feature film—something never previously attempted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

“As we progressed through the planning stages the vision grew to the point where we decided to make the most of our opportunity to document our Church’s history in a modern medium,” Pastor Stanley said. “We’re striving to make it as professional and inspirational as possible.”

Utilising specialised talent from Hollywood to prepare the script, the Adventist Media Network (AMN) at Wahroonga, NSW, is producing the film. 

“Hollywood is known for its great storytelling and Adventism has a great story,” said Dr Allan Lindsay, the project’s chief historian. “Our goal is to be as truthful to our story as we can be. We have a team of historians auditing our script to make sure we tell the story accurately and maintain the integrity of the film.”

AMN’s Kyle Portbury, director of Tell The World, is excited about the authentic filming locations he found while scouting overseas. “We discovered a pioneer village in Canada that is practically perfect to tell our story in,” he said. “The look and feel is not only mid-1800s New England, but being a ‘living history’ village there is a high level of authenticity that you only get when people plough a field every year with 170-year-old equipment or still bake bread in an original 1840s bakery. We think the set alone will transport the audience back in time.”



Filming will commence mid-2013 following the completion of pre-production work, including actor auditions and costuming.

Visit <auc.adventist.org.au> for more information.