Adventists return to Egypt

0
108
SHARE

Crieff Seventh-day Adventist Church members are now heading back to Egypt as part of the teaching staff at Nile Union Academy, an Adventist High School in Egypt. The school plans to reopen this week after the Egyptian Revolution of 2011.

Millions of protestors from a variety of socio-economic backgrounds and religions demanded the overthrow of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. During the three week protest, many Adventist’s returned home to different parts of Europe to escape the turmoil.

This is now a time for prayer for God to hold back those who would want to hinder the work of the three angels' messages and to bring about the freedom...

The demonstrations brought more opportunities for the Seventh-day Adventist Church than ever imagined. Egypt Field President for the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Pastor Llewellyn Edwards, told British Union Conference News that over recent weeks some 20 Muslims have visited the Church Headquarters to assure the Christian community of their support.

Last Sabbath six members of the Muslim community attended the Adventist church service to express solidarity. Pastor Edwards states that “on the Friday evening of the departure of Mubarak, I was standing with the local pastor outside our Heliopolis church, watching the growing celebrations and we were approached by many Muslims telling us that this victory was for Christians as well and assuring us of their friendship.”

 
Karin Edwards (L) with two Egyptian girls during the celebrations at the Square just a hundred metres from the Egypt field office last Friday night.  

 
His wife Karin Edwards adds, “We went into the church and prayed together, then we joined the crowds walking to Roxy Square. We stood in awe at what we were experiencing.”

“We will never forget it—one massive street party. I have never experienced anything like it—the jubilant deafening noise—shouting, chanting, horns blaring, flags waving, people walking around with banners, people leaning out of car windows, standing on top of cars and monuments, shaking hands and congratulating everyone else around them, huge flags carried down the street with cars moving at a snail’s pace going under them. It was surreal.”

Pastor Edwards, formerly President of the Adventist Church in Scotland, wrote to all the Adventist churches in Egypt this last Sabbath stating that “now is the time for us to seek God’s blessing in healing this ancient land.”

He pointed them to the healing offered in 2 Chronicles 7:14, “If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land.”

 

He writes, “There are many forces – internal and external, hidden and open, who would seek to manipulate the future of Egypt. This is now a time for prayer for God to hold back those who would want to hinder the work of the three angels’ messages and to bring about the freedom that would bless the good people of this country and the work of the Adventist Church.”

Pastor Edwards requests particular prayer for a peaceful transition to a government with freedom for all people, opportunities out of this time of chaos for the Church to prosper, good relationships between people of all faiths and for fairness and justice for the many poor and underprivileged people of Egypt.

Reacting to the present situation, Karin Edwards plans to run Stress Management courses and Relaxation classes in the church’s Healthy-Life Centre.

Another result of the turmoil is that the church headquarters has made really good friends with those in the community who have been protecting them in recent weeks. They say, “This revolution has brought neighbours we never knew together in an amazing way.”

What of Egypt’s future? “Only God knows,” Karin responds, “But we keep praying for God’s Spirit to move through this land and that men of peace, justice, fairness, and honesty will eventually rule and there will be equal opportunities and freedom for all religious groups.”